Return to Elder Main Page Elder Family Research
You must REGISTER before you will be able to post on our Bulletin Board
This protects our Members from unauthorized use of this Bulletin Board.
Please read the FAQ for this Bulletin Board before using (see button below).
 
  Return to Elder Main Page  FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Biographies of Rev. John ELDER

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Elder Family Research Forum Index -> Mid-Atlantic Elder Lines
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
nancyp
Site Admin


Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 594
Location: Vancouver, WA USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2004 4:04 pm    Post subject: Biographies of Rev. John ELDER Reply with quote

From EGLE's book:
Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies. Lane S. Hart.
Harrisburg. 1886.
Reprint: Publisher : Baltimore : Genealogical Pub. Co., 1969.
Description : viii, 798 p. ; 23 cm.

Page152:
III. JOHN ELDER,2 (Robert,1) b. January 26, 1706, in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland; d.
July 17, 1792, in Paxtang township, Dauphin county, Pa. He received a classical education,
and graduated from the University at Edinburgh. He subsequently studied divinity, and, in
1732, was licensed to preach the gospel. Four or five years later, the son followed the footsteps
of his parents and friends, and came to America. Coming as a regularly licensed minister, he
was received by New Castle Presbytery, having brought credentials to that body, afterward to
Donegal Presbytery, on the 5th of October, 1737. Paxtang congregation having separated from
that of Derry in 1735, and Rev. Mr. Bertram adhering to the latter, left that of Paxtang vacant,
and they were unanimous in giving Rev. John Elder a call. This he accepted on the 12th of
April, 1738, and on the 22d of November following, he was ordained and installed, the Rev.
Samuel Black presiding. The early years of Mr. Elder's ministry were not those of ease; for in
the second year the Whitfield excitement took a wide spread over the Presbyterian Church. He
preached against this religious furore, or the "great revival," as it was termed, and for this he
was accused to the Presbytery of propagating "false doctrine." That body cleared him,
however, in December, 1740; "but a separation was made," says Webster, "and the conjunct
Presbyters answered the supplications sent to them the next summer, by sending Campbell and
Rowland to those who forsook him. He signed the protest. His support being reduced, he took
charge of the 'Old Side' portion of the Derry congregation." Following closely upon these
ecclesiastical troubles came the French and Indian war. Associations were formed throughout
the Province of Pennsylvania for the defense of the frontiers, and the congregations of Mr.
Elder were prompt to embody themselves. Their minister became their leader--their captain--and they were trained as scouts. He
superintended the discipline of his men, and his mounted rangers became widely known as the "Paxtang Boys." During two summers, at
least, every man who attended Paxtang church carried his rifle with him, and their minister took his.
Subsequently, he was advanced to the dignity
Page 153
of colonel by the Provincial authorities, the date of his commission being July 11, 1763. He
had command of the block-houses and stockades from Easton to the Susquehanna. The
Governor, in tendering this appointment, expressly stated that nothing more would be expected
of him than the general oversight. "His justification," says Webster, "lies in the crisis of affairs
... Bay at York, Steel at Conecocheague, and Griffith at New Castle, with Burton and
Thompson, the church missionaries, at Carlisle, headed companies, and were actively engaged." During the latter part of the summer of 1763, many murders were committed in
Paxtang, culminating in the destruction of the Indians on Conestoga Manor and at Lancaster.
Although the men composing the company of Paxtang men who exterminated the murderous
savages referred to belonged to his obedient and faithful rangers, it has never been proved that
the Rev. Mr. Elder had previous knowledge of the plot formed, although the Quaker
pamphleteers of the day charged him with aiding and abetting the destruction of the Indians.
When the deed was done, and the Quaker authorities were determined to proceed to extreme
lengths with the participants, and denounced the frontiersmen as "riotous and murderous Irish
Presbyterians," he took sides with the border inhabitants, and sought to condone the deed. His
letters published in connection with the history of that transaction prove him to have been a manjudicious, firm, and decided. During the controversy which ensued, he was the author of one of the pamphlets: "Letter from a Gentleman in one of the Back Counties to a Friend in Philadelphia." He was relieved from his command by the Governor of the Province, who
directed that Major Asher Clayton take charge of the military establishment. Peace, however,
was restored--not only in civil affairs, but in the church. The union of the synods brought the
Rev. John Elder into the same Presbytery with Messrs. John Roan, Robert Smith, and George
Duffield, they being at first in a minority, but rapidly settling the vacancies with New Side men.
By the leave of synod, the Rev. Mr. Elder joined the Second Philadelphia Presbytery May 19, 1768, and on the formation of the General Assembly, became a member of Carlisle Presbytery. At the time the British army overran New
Jersey,driving before them the fragments of our discouraged, naked, and half starved troops, and without any previous arrangement, the
Rev. Mr. Elder went on Sunday, as usual, to Paxtang church. The hour arrived for church-service, when, instead of a sermon, he began a
short and hasty prayer to the Throne of Grave?? then called upon the patriotism of all effective men present, and exhorted them to aid in
support of liberty's cause and the defense of the country. In less than thirty minutes a company of volunteers was formed. Colonel Robert Elder, the parson's eldest son, was chosen captain. They marched next day, though in winter. His son John, at sixteen years, was among the first. His son Joshua, sub-lieutenant of Lancaster county, could not quit the service he was employed in, but sent a substitute. Until his death,for a period of fifty-six years, he continued the faithful minister of the congregations over which he had been placed in the prime of his
youthful vigor, passing the age not generally allotted to man--that of fourscore and six years. His death was deeply lamented far and wide.
Not one of all those who had welcomed him to his early field of labor survived him. Charles Miner, the historian of Wyoming, gives this
opinion of Rev. John Elder: "I am greatly struck with the evidences of learning, talent, and spirit displayed by him. He was, beyond doubt, the most extraordinary man of Eastern Pennsylvania. I hope some one may draw up a full memoir of his life, and a narrative, well digested, of
his times ... He was a very extraordinary man, of mostextensive influence, full of activity and enterprise, learned, pious, and a ready writer. I take him to have been of the old Cameronian blood. Had his lot been cast in New England, he would have been a leader of the Puritans." He had, with one who well remembered the old minister, "a good and very handsome face. His features were regular--no one prominent--good complexion, with blue eyes ... He was a portly, long, straight man, over six feet in height,large frame and body, with rather heavy legs ... He
did not talk broad Scotch, but spoke much as we do now, yet grammatically." His remains quietly reposeamid the scenes of his earthly
labors, in the burying-ground of old Paxtang church, by the side of those who loved and revered him. Over his dust a marble slab bears the
inscription dictated by his friend and neighbor, William Maclay, first United States Senator from Pennsylvania.
The Rev. Mr. Elder was twice married; m., first, in 1740, MARY BAKER, b. 1715, in county
Antrim, Ireland; d. June 12, 1749, in Paxtang; dau. of Joshua Baker, of Lancaster, Pa. They
had issue:
8. i. Robert, b. Friday, June 11, 1742; m. Mary J. Thompson.
9. ii. Joshua, b. March 9, 1744-5; m., 1st, Mary McAllister; 2d,
Sarah McAllister.
iii. Eleanor, b. December 3, 1749; m. John Hays.
iv. Grizel, b. May 2, 1749; d. September 18, 1769.

Mr. Elder m., secondly, November 5, 1751, MARY SIMPSON, dau. of Thomas and Sarah
Simpson, of Paxtang; b. 1732, in Paxtang; d. October 3, 1786, at 6, A. M., and had issue:
v. Sarah, b. October 19, 1752; d. February 14, 1822; m.
James Wallace. (see Robert Wallace record.)
10. vi. Ann, b. October 8, 1754; m. Andrew Stephen.
11. vii. John, b. August 3, 1757; m. Elizabeth Awl.
viii. Mary, b. January 12, 1760; m. James Wilson. (see Wilson
record.)
ix. Jane, b. May 21, 1762; d. August 6, 1763.
12. x. James, b. Friday, June 15, 1764; m. Lucinda Wallace.
13. xi. Thomas, b. January 30, 1767; m., 1st, Catharine Cox; 2d,
Elizabeth Shippen Jones.
14. xii. David, b. May 7, 1769; m. Jane Galbraith.
15. xiii. Samuel, b. February 27, 1772; m. Margaret Espy.
16. xiv. Michael, b. August 9, 1773; m. Nancy McKinney.
xv. Rebecca, b. March 1, 1775; m. James Awl. (see Awl
record.)
_________________
Nancy Elder Petersen
Vancouver, WA USA
Host, ELDER DNA project
results:
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/Elder
NancyElderPeterSEN@yahoo.com


Last edited by nancyp on Fri Feb 20, 2004 4:20 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
nancyp
Site Admin


Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 594
Location: Vancouver, WA USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2004 4:19 pm    Post subject: Rev. John ELDER in PA history Reply with quote

Rev. John ELDER biography is sketched along with
other ELDER names in the book:
"History of Westmoreland County, PA" vol. 3, pages 533-539, transcribed here:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~nancyelder/ElderHistory.htm

Excerpt:
"2. John Elder, second son of Robert Elder, Sr., was born in Edinburg, Scotland, 1706. John Elder won distinction as a colonel in the revolutionary war. He received a classical education and graduated from the University of Edinburg. He subsequently studied divinity, and in 1732 was licensed to preach the gospel. In 1836, four years afterwards, he followed in the footsteps of his parents and came to America.
The Paxtang church gave him a unanimous call, which he accepted, but trouble soon arose. The Whitfield excitement or revival spread over the Presbyterian church and Mr. Elder preached against it. He was accused of preaching false doctrine; he was tried by the presbytery, which sustained him. The Whitefield followers separated from him. Following these ecclesiastical troubles came the French and Indian war.
Associations were formed throughout the province of Pennsylvania for the defense of the frontiers, and the congregations were prompt to embody themselves. Rev John Elder became their leader and captain, and they were trained as scouts. He superintended the discipline of the
men, and his mountain rangers were known as the Paxtan boys. During two summers at least, every man who attended church carried his trusty rifle with him, also the minister took his. Subsequently he was advanced to the dignity of colonel by the Provincial authorities, his commission being dated July 11, 1763. He had charge of all the block houses from Easton to the Susquehanna river. At the outbreak of the revolution, when the British army overran New Jersey, driving before them our half-starved soldiers, Rev. Elder went to church one Sabbath
as usual. He began with a hasty prayer, then called upon the patriotism of all effective men present and exhorted them to aid in the spirit of liberty's cause and defense of their country. In less than thirty minutes a company of volunteers was formed, Colonel Robert Elder, the pastor's son, was chosen captain, and his son John, then sixteen years old, was the first to enlist; they marched the following day. His son
John was a lieutenant and afterwards judge of Mifflin county. The Historian of Wyoming county says that Colonel John Elder was beyond doubt the most extraordinary man of eastern Pennsylvania. He had great influence, was full of activity and enterprise, and was a learned, pious, fearless and ready writer. Over his grave is a marble slab dedicated by his friend and neighbor, William Maclay, the first United States senator from Pennsylvania; it bears the following inscription:
"The body of John Elder lies under this slab, born 1706, died 1792, aged eighty-six. Sixty years he filled the sacred character as minister of the Gospel, fifty-six of which he officiated at Paxtang."
_________________
Nancy Elder Petersen
Vancouver, WA USA
Host, ELDER DNA project
results:
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/Elder
NancyElderPeterSEN@yahoo.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
nancyp
Site Admin


Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 594
Location: Vancouver, WA USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2004 11:43 pm    Post subject: presbyterian bio Reply with quote

REV. JOHN ELDER (in Pennsylvania)
Pages 26-29, In THE CENTENNIAL MEMORIAL ofthe PRESBYTERY of CARLISLE.
Vol. 2, Biographical. Published by MEYERS, Harrisburg, 1889.

Rev. John Elder, Rev. Samuel Caven and Rev. Samuel Thompson came into the Presbytery of Donegal, now Carlisle, about the same time. September 1, 1737, the Presbytery of Donegal was requested by the congregation of Paxton and by commissioners from Pennsboro' to apply to the Presbytery of New Castle for a hearing in these places of some of their probationers. The reason why that Presbytery had more licentiates than Donegal has been already stated. At the next meeting, October 5, 1737, Messrs. John Elder and Samuel Caven, the former from New Castle Presbytery and the latter immediately from Ireland, having produced sufficient testimonials, and having preached to the satisfaction of Presbytery and adopted the Westminster confession of faith and catechisms, as the confession of their faith and promised obedience to Presbytery, were taken under its care.
At the next meeting, November 17, 1737, Mr. Samuel Thompson, a student recently from Ireland and a licentiate of the Presbytery of New Castle, was received.
John Elder was the second son of Robert Elder of Scotland, who was settled for a time in County Antrim, Ireland, and from thence with his family, except John, about 1730, came to America and located in Paxton township, then Lancaster, now Dauphin county, on a tract of land five miles north of Harrisburg, Pa.
John Elder, according to Sprague's Annals, was born in County Antrim in 1706. According to Egle's Pennsylvania Genealogies, he was born
in the city of Edinburg, January 26, 1706. Sprague says he was left in Edinburgh in care of his uncle, Rev. John Elder, to complete his classical studies and prepare for the ministry. He graduated at the University of Edinburgh, studied theology and was licensed to preach in 1732. Four or five years afterwards, probably in 1736, he came to America, presented his credentials to the Presbytery of New Castle and was received by that body and sent by it to the Presbytery of Donegal, October, 1737. Mr. Bertram having been released from Paxton congregation in 1735, that people April 12, 1738, unanimously called Mr. Elder, which call he accepted and was ordained and installed there November 22, of that year.
At the time of his settlement the excitement caused by the great revival movement of that periiod had already extended to that region. Mr. Elder took his position very decidedly with the old side party. He preached against what he styled the "religious furore" of that time and of that movement. Two years after his settlement, he was charged by reason of this, with having preached doctrines at variance with the standards of the church. Though the charge was shown to be groundless, it became the occasion of a great agitation and led to a division of his congregation.
The party separating made application to the New Side Presbytery of New Castle for supplies and the next summer Rev. Erends Campbell and Rev. John Rowland were sent to supply them and other places where the people sympathized with the New Side party in the Presbytery. This was the Mr. Rowland under whose preaching, Mr. William Alexander, the grandfather of Dr. Archibald Alexander, before he moved to
Virginia, became a subject of divine grace. This fact Dr. Alexander learned of Dr. Robert Smith, of Pequea in 1791, when on his way from Virginia to the General Assembly in Philadelphia.
Mr. Elder was one of those who signed the protest in the Synod in 1741.
And it was the people of Paxton and Derry who overtured the Synod in 1735 for a more definite declaration as to the adoption of the standards than that of 1729 and which led the Synod in order to the removal of all ground of jealousy on account of the expression of scruples which was allowed as to matters non-essential, used in the adopting act, to say that year, "that Synod adopted and still adhered to the Westminster confession, catechisms and directory for worship, without the least variation or alteration and without any true intent in the first adopting act of
said confession."
Mr. Elder after the division of Paxton and Derry congregations retained the charge of the Old Side portion of Paxton and took charge of the Old Side portion of Derry congregation.
Mr. Elder was a public-spirited man, of great energy and decision of character. He took the command of the "Paxtang Boys" during the troublous times of the French and Indian war and in 1763 was appointed a colonel by the Provincial authorities and had command or rather the superintendence of the blockhouses and stockades from Easton on the Delaware to the Susquehanna, nothing more being expected of him, as
stipulated by the Governor in his appointment, than a general oversight. Such services were regarded as justified upon the part of the ministers of that day, by the crisis of affairs then existing in the country. The Indian massacre on Conestoga Manor and at Lancaster in 1763, on account of which Mr. Elder was subject to much criticism and some censure, was perpetrated despite his more earnest remonstrance.
The union of the Synod in 1758, brought Mr. Elder and his Old Side friends in the Donegal Presbytery into union with a number of warm New Side men of the New Castle Presbytery. To escape from these unpleasant associations Mr. Elder and some others, by the action of Synod, were set off to the Second Presbytery of Philadelphia. On the formation of the General Assembly in 1788 he became a member of Carlisle
Presbytery.
At the period of the American Revolution Mr. Elder warmly espoused the cause of American Independence. At the time when the British army overran New Jersy and drove before them the remnant of our half-starved and poorly-clad troops, in response to a brief and earnest appeal by Mr. Elder, at a Sabbath morning service, to his people, a company of volunteers was quickly formed, of which his oldest son Robert was chosen captain and of which his younger son John, then only sixteen, became a private member. The next day though in midwinter, they marched away to the scene of conflict.
Mr. Elder continued pastor of that part of the congregation of Paxton which adhered to the Old Side, and at the death of Rev. John Roan, the New Side portion of the congregation of Derry, united with that of Paxton in receiving him as their minister, and for a period of fifty-three years Mr. Elder was pastor of that people and died, highly respected and deeply lamented, at the advanced age of eight-six years (d. 7-17-1792).
Mr. Elder, from all the evidence which can now be gathered with respect to his character and life, was a man conspicuous in his day for talent, learning and piety; a man of robust constitution, of strong and decided convictions, of great courage, of indomitable energy and strenth of purpose; a man full of public spirit, of extensive influence and in many respects one of the foremost men of his day; a man similar in the prominent characteristics of mind and disposition to John C. Calhoun or Andrew Jackson.
He was a tall portly man, over six feet in height and of strong and heavy frame. He had, said one who well remembered the old minister, a good and very handsome face, his features were regular and he was of fair complexion and had blue eyes. He was a man of affairs, being equally sucessful as a farmer, a soldier and a minister. His remains lie buried in the old Paxton graveyard. He was twice married and had fifteen
children, four by the first and eleven by the second wife.
_________________
Nancy Elder Petersen
Vancouver, WA USA
Host, ELDER DNA project
results:
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/Elder
NancyElderPeterSEN@yahoo.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
nancyp
Site Admin


Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 594
Location: Vancouver, WA USA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2004 9:50 pm    Post subject: Esmond Wright -Essays in Scotch-Irish History Reply with quote

Webpage for an E-Book Transcription:
"Ulster Settlers in America "
The Very Reverend Howard Cromie, BA, B. D., M. A., D. D.,
http://www.lisburn.com/books/ulstersettlers/ulstersettlers3.htm
...
"Another well-known figure on the frontier was the Rev. John Elder, a native of County Antrim and a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, he emigrated to the New World. There he became minister of the Presbyterian Church at Derry in Pennsylvania from 1736 to 1771. It is said that when John Elder entered the pulpit he carried his rifle with him and kept n close beside him while the men of his congregation stacked theirs under guard at the entrance to the church or hung them on the wooden pins around the interior of the church building.33

Biblio entry for John ELDER's quote ref #33 is transcribed here:
Chapter VI (has references at the end):
"They Provided Leadership" -
http://www.lisburn.com/books/ulstersettlers/ulstersettlers4.htm

#33: "Esmond Wright - Essays in Scotch-Irish History, p. 23"

A better citation is:
Wright, Esmond. "Education in the American Colonies" in
Essays in Scotch-Irish History. E R R Green, Editor. Ulster Historical Foundation, 1992.
*******

From Library of Congress book entry:
Essays in Scotch-Irish history / edited by E.R.R. Green ;
with a new introduction by Steve Ickringill.
Belfast : Ulster Historical Foundation, 1992.
Green, E. R. R. (Edward Rodney Richey), 1920-
Queen's University of Belfast.
Ulster-Scot Historical Foundation.
xvi, 110 p. [2] leaves of plates : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
ISBN: 0901905534
Notes: Originally published: London : Routledge & Kegan Paul,
1969 as vol. 2. of Ulster-Scot historical series.
Originally delivered as lectures at a symposium sponsored
by the Ulster-Scott Historical Foundation at the Queen's
University, Belfast, in Sept. 1965.
Includes bibliographical reference and index.
Subjects: Scots-Irish--United States--History.
Scots--Ulster (Northern Ireland and Ireland)--History.
LC Classification: E184.S4 E8 1992
_________________
Nancy Elder Petersen
Vancouver, WA USA
Host, ELDER DNA project
results:
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/Elder
NancyElderPeterSEN@yahoo.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
nancyp
Site Admin


Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 594
Location: Vancouver, WA USA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 10, 2004 10:39 am    Post subject: Rev. Howard Cromie of Northern Ireland Reply with quote

Reverend "Howard Cromie" current bio:
Webpage with music link:
click: "the mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea"
http://www.lisburn.com/popups/dr_howard_cromie.htm

"Dr Howard Cromie is Senior Minister of Railway Street Presbyterian Church, Lisburn,
[County Antrim, Northern Ireland]
He had a very challenging ministry in his various spheres of labour,
first in his Assistantships in Edinburgh and Belfast and then in his
Pastorates in Enniskillen and Lisburn. In this Volume he shares with his
readers his recollections of growing up on a farm in County Down,
his memories of wartime and his experiences during "The Troubles".
Dr Cromie gives us many interesting and sometimes amusing pen
pictures of happenings during his ministry in his different congregations
as well as in his Convenerships of The Irish Mission and Church Extension."
The author shares with us also his deeply held convictions about the Primacy of
Preaching and his commitment to the proclamation of the Gospel.
His service to the Church at large was recognised by his Election to the
Moderatorship of The General Assembly in 1984.
Now enjoying retirement. Dr and Mrs. Cromie live in Newcastle
[County Down, Northern Ireland] where
"the mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea." (music link)."
_________________
Nancy Elder Petersen
Vancouver, WA USA
Host, ELDER DNA project
results:
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/Elder
NancyElderPeterSEN@yahoo.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
nancyp
Site Admin


Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 594
Location: Vancouver, WA USA

PostPosted: Thu Mar 03, 2005 1:32 pm    Post subject: Encyclopedia of the Presby. Church Reply with quote

Transcription of Rev. John ELDER bio:
http://sdss4.physics.lsa.umich.edu:8080/~mckay/amckay/presbioe.htm#Rev. John Elder
Source:
" Encyclopedia of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America: Including the Northern and Southern Assemblies, Alfred Nevin, D.D., LL.D., Editor, Philadelphia (Presbyterian Encyclopedia Publishing Co., 1884). "

"Rev. John Elder (1706-1792)"
He was born in the county of Antrim, Ireland, in 1706. He came to this country as a licentiate, and was ordained and installed, by the Presbytery of New Castle, pastor of the churches of Paxton and Derry, near Harrisonburg, Pennsylvania, November 22d, 1738. When associations for defense against the Indians were formed throughout the province Mr. Elder's hearers, being on the frontier, were prompt to embody themselves. Their minister was their captain and they were trained as rangers. He superintended their discipline, and his mounted men became widely known as the "Paxton Boys." He afterwards held a Colonel's commission from the Proprietaries, and had the command of the blockhouses and stockades, from Easton to the
Susquehanna. In tendering this appointment to him it was expressly stated that nothing more would be expected of him than the general oversight. His
justification lies in the crisis of affairs.

Mr. Elder joined the Second Presbytery of Philadelphia, May 19th, 1768. In the formation of the General Assembly he became a member of the
Presbytery of Carlisle. He died, in the year 1792, at the age of eighty-six, having been a minister of the gospel sixty years, and the pastor of the
congregations in Paxton and Derry fifty-six. He is represented by those who knew him as having been a fine looking man, above six feet high, well
formed and proportioned, and dignified in manner. "
_________________
Nancy Elder Petersen
Vancouver, WA USA
Host, ELDER DNA project
results:
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/Elder
NancyElderPeterSEN@yahoo.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Elder Family Research Forum Index -> Mid-Atlantic Elder Lines All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group